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5 Educational Trends for 2013

 

2012 is drawing to a close, and 2013 lies ahead of us. Time to take a look at some of the educational trends that have emerged over the last 12 months, and that are likely to dominate the educational technology scene in the coming year. Here are five trends that I think will still be getting plenty of airtime in 2013.

Photo by rosemarie sw

Trend 1: The flipped classroom

Although the notion of the flipped classroom has been around for more than 12 months, 2012 has seen it at the apex of Gartner’s hype cycle  – namely at the ‘peak of inflated expectations’.  One could argue that EFL teachers have been flipping the classroom for years  (language exercises for homework, and language practice in the classroom), and it’s all simply a matter of common sense and good teaching. But we expect the hype to continue into 2013. (If you need to get up to speed on exactly what the flipped classroom is, check out Ana d’Almeida’s excellent article on the topic, from April 2012).

Trend 2: MOOCs

Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have also been around for a number of years, but with the likes of MIT, Stanford and Yale offering MOOCs, they appeared in the mainstream media in 2012. (For a quick refresher on MOOCs, read my 1-minute guide to MOOCs blog post). In the field of English language teaching, MOOCs have been around for a while as well, providing teachers with excellent free opportunities for online professional development. Two sources of MOOCs that I particularly recommend for 2013:

  • The Electronic Village Online MOOCs start in January 2013
  • SEETA (South Eastern Europe Teachers Associations) regularly offers MOOCs for language teachers – keep an eye on their website for their free ‘online courses’ in 2013.

Trend 3: Mobile & BYOD

A quick look at any of the statistics showing mobile penetration in developed and developing countries confirms significant growth. Here’s part of an infographic showing mobile phone ownership around the world in 2011:

[Click on the image or here to see the original infographic]

 And education is well placed to harness this potential as the debate around issues such as BYOD (bring your own device) shows. Assuming of course that schools unban the use of mobile devices in the classroom. Meanwhile, entire school districts have been trialling BYOD, and early adopters in our own field of English language teaching have been experimenting with netbooks, tablets and mobile phones with their classes. Watch videos of EFL teachers talking about their mobile learning projects, their successes and challenges, and their advice to other teachers planning to do the same. We hope mobile will be making more of an appearance in ELT classrooms in 2013 -and indeed my colleague Gavin Dudeney and I are writing a book for teachers on mobile learning (due out in 2014) that we hope will help this process along!

Trend 4: Augmented reality

Augmented reality has moved from the realm of sci-fi movies into our own mobile devices. 2012 has seen the advent of augmented reality apps that allow users to easily – and freely – create their own augmented reality layers. Although some apps (such as String) require markers to be printed out, apps such as Junaio allow you to create your own augmented reality info. With the development of the Google’s Project Glass, wearable augmented reality is becoming an increasingly probable part of our future wardrobes as well. Check out the Project Glass video for how that’s going to look!

Trend 5: Digital literacies

Digital literacies, new media skills, digital competences … Whatever you choose to call them, they are now in mainstream schooling curricula around the world. Part of the core competences that make up so-called 21st-century skills, digital literacies are being discussed within English language teaching as well, and teachers are asking themselves exactly how to bring them into the classroom.  ‘Digital Literacies’, the book that Gavin Dudeney, Mark Pegrum and myself have written, is due out in the next few months…. So digital literacies is  going to be on the ELT educational landscape for 2013, we hope! And if you need a quick refresher on what digital literacies are, here’s my attempt to summarise them in a 3-minute video.

What other edtech trends do you think will continue into 2013? I’d love to hear your take on this, in the Comments below :-)

Nicky Hockly
The Consultants-E
December 2012


20 Comments

  1. sandra troia says:

    Il modello della “flipped classroom” risulta particolarmente valido per creare negli allievi competenze esperte di cittadinanza digitale. L’allievo, in questo caso, sarà guidato dal docente non a svolgere l’esercizio ma a costruire l’esercizio per il proprio gruppo di lavoro e, in generale, per il proprio gruppo di pari. Per esempio l’attività di ricerca-azione attraverso webquest risulterà un’esperienza di apprendimento maggiormente significativa per il soggetto se sarà egli stesso a definire modalità, risorse, tempi e criteri di valutazione.

  2. […] 5 Educational Trends for 2013 – e-moderation station 5 Educational Trends for 2013 – e-moderation station […]

  3. […] trends for the next year Posted on 13 December, 2012 by Simon Thomas Nicky Hockly describes five eduational trends for 2013.Share this post:Bookmark on DeliciousDigg this postRecommend on FacebookGoogle Buzz-up this […]

  4. Pierre Bourgoin says:

    Thanks Nicky. This read was useful for me recently!

    Do you see HTML5 causing any important trends with more multimedia integration in e-books, etc.?

    Pierre

    1. Nicky Hockly says:

      Hi Pierre,
      Thanks for dropping by, and glad you found the post useful :-). Yes, I think HTML 5 and the demise of Flash will facilitate access to a range of content across devices, and also simplify things for developers. But I’m not sure e-books are a particularly innovative trend within education – although I’ve seen some very snazzy examples, they tend to be very similar content to traditional print books, just with a few more bells and whistles.

  5. […] Includes a brief description and discussion of: the flipped classroom, MOOCs (massively open online courses), mobile learning (ie, cell phones), augmented reality, digital literacies.  […]

  6. […] Includes a brief description and discussion of: the flipped classroom, MOOCs (massively open online courses), mobile learning (ie, cell phones), augmented reality, digital literacies.  […]

  7. josh says:

    Thanks Nicky, useful post. 2914 is a bit of a long time to wait for you book though ;-) I’m guessing we’ll have gone beyond mobile by then…

    1. Nicky Hockly says:

      Thanks Josh, I’m the Queen of Typos, and have just corrected the publishing date error to 2014. But 2914 we’ll probably have entire library contents implanted into our brains at birth, so I agree we wouldn’t have much of a market for our book (or indeed any book) ;-)

  8. […] Includes a brief description and discussion of: the flipped classroom, MOOCs (massively open online courses), mobile learning (ie, cell phones), augmented reality, digital literacies.  […]

  9. […] El 2012 está a punto de terminar; es hora de analizar algunas de las tendencias tecnológicas en educación que surgieron en los últimos 12 meses y que probablemente se consoliden el año próximo. Veremos aquí cinco de estas tendencias: flipped classrooms, MOOCs, mobile y BYOD, Realidad Aumentada y competencias digitales.  […]

  10. Education has become versatile and it can be taken fro different channels. The latest and most effective trend I believe is online education. it simply shows that education indeed knows no age and boundaries.

    1. Nicky Hockly says:

      Thanks for bringing up online learning Nancy, although I’m not sure I would include it as a new or recent trend. It’s been around in its present form (mainly based on the VLE) for about 15 years now.

  11. […] 2012 is drawing to a close, and 2013 lies ahead of us. Time to take a look at some of the educational trends that have emerged over the last 12  […]

  12. Greetings, Maybe we in developed countries take blended learning, MOOCs and technology-integrated learning more or less for granted, but I think one near future trend will be the trickle-down effect of seeing these in less developed regions and countries as well. As greater technology becomes more available at presumably “lower” levels of culture and society worldwide, we’ll see more and more currently under-developed regions utilizing an increasing quantity of technology to aid in closing the gap. Lack of resources will be less of a problem if technology can be used to gain access to the best minds, newest theories and techniques, resources unavailable locally and the experience of both teachers and learners alike irregardless of geographic location.
    Larry M.Lynch recently posted..How Technology Improves Student Learning and Sends More Kids to Graduate SchoolMy Profile

  13. Nicky Hockly says:

    Thanks for your comment, Larry. Although the trickle-down effect may be one way that technology spreads to low resource contexts or developing nations, there are some low resource contexts that in fact are in the avant-garde of using technology – this is especially the case with mobile.

    Because mobile doesn’t need the same investment in infrastructure, more traditional technology is being leapfrogged over and mobile used for all sorts of interesting projects in development, and also in the field of education, in countries like Nigeria, Bangladesh, China, South Africa….

    You’ve put me in the mind to write a blog post about this, thank you!

    1. Greetings and thanks for your response. A post on this would be great. Actually in low tech areas where I teach I do make more use of mobile since almost all of the learners have a cellular phone. They can send and receive txt messages at least so I seldom do more than that with them. Many of them cannot manage more than that, but usually it’s enough. I’ll keep an eye out for the post. Thanks again.
      Larry M.Lynch recently posted..How Technology Improves Student Learning and Sends More Kids to Graduate SchoolMy Profile

      1. Nicky Hockly says:

        Hi again Larry,

        Thanks for sharing what you do with your students and their mobile phones. My colleague Gavin Dudeney and I have recently published a series of lesson plans for using mobile phones (including feature phones) on OneStop English site, called ‘Mobile English':
        http://www.onestopenglish.com/support/mobile-english/

        The plans start from very simple text-based tasks, and work up to more complex project work involving smartphones. Take a look, you might find a few ideas to try out with your students -and if you do, let me know how it goes!

        Hope this is useful,
        Nicky

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